Indoor Meetings for 2015 - 16

Field Meetings for 2016

Friday: 16 October
Istanbul: On the Brink of a Mega-Disaster.
Ekbal Hussain MSci (Geological Sciences), University of Leeds

Friday: 13 November
Slow faults and earthquake hazard: the past is the key to the present
Laura Gregory DPhil., University of Leeds

11 December
Aridification in the Libyan Sahara, human migration and the age of the Sahara?
Mark Hounslow Ph.D., University of Lancaster

15 January
The End-Triassic mass extinction: what went extinct and why?
Alex Dunhill Ph.D., University of Leeds

12 February
The Rock Route - A gelogical tour of the NW Highlands Geopark
Lesley Collins

11 March
Cancelled

15 April
John Milne Documentary
Will Twycross & Paul Kabrna

Sunday 22 May
Burnsall and Trollers Gill
Paul Kabrna & David Leather

Fri - Sun. 24 to 26 June
Northumberland
Lesley Collins & Paul Kabrna

Saturday 16 July
Knaresborough Gorge
Paul Kabrna

Sunday 14 August
Heysham
Barbara Gordon

Sunday 11 September
Derbyshire
Karen Ashworth & Steve Birch

 


Istanbul: On the Brink of a Mega-Disaster.
Ekbal Hussain MSci (Geological Sciences), University of Leeds

Istanbul is an ancient and beautiful city. With a population of around 14 million people it is also one of the world's largest. But this thriving metropolis sits on the edge of one of the fastest moving earthquake generating faults in the world.

This talk begins with an overview of earthquake hazards and tectonics. Where and why do earthquakes occur and why do some result in many casualties and others in none?

I then describe the earthquake hazard faced by Istanbul. I highlight key evidence showing that a major, potentially catastrophic quake is due near the city within the next decade or two. I end with a few examples of what Turkey is doing to prepare for and manage this disaster.

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Slow faults and earthquake hazard: the past is the key to the present
Laura Gregory DPhil., University of Leeds

The Altay Mountains in western Mongolia lie at the northern edge of the India-Asia collision. To build a mountain range, the earth's crust is subjected to immense stresses that break the crust into long fractures, or faults, which move in earthquakes. Over longer time scales, repeated movements on faults cause uplift of the earth's surface to form mountains that are then modified by erosion to produce the landscape that we see today. The evolution of a mountain range occurs on signifcantly different time scales, and it is difficult to compare measurements of processes over such vastly different lengths of time: from the scale of hundreds to thousands of years for an earthquake cycle, to tens of thousands of years for changes in small-scale topography, to millions of years for the uplift and eventual erosion of a mountain belt. My research is focused on quantifying these processes, and comparing the rates and styles of tectonic deformation that occur on time scales of different orders of magnitude. The work also helps to understand the human hazards that exist due to the presence of active faults.

I use a range of geochemical and field-based tools to investigate the rates and styles of continental deformation. My research is driven by making observations of deformation on a range of scales in time and space- from determining the characteristics of fault slip over multiple earthquake cycles on normal faults in central Italy to measuring the cooling of rocks due to the uplift of mountains over millions of years in the Mongolian Altay Mountains.

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Aridification in the Libyan Sahara, human migration and the age of the Sahara?.
Mark Hounslow Ph.D., University of Lancaster

A green Sahara has been put forward as a hypothesis, to sustain the migration of the early humans northwards out of central Africa, across the Sahara. This is based on the occurrence of assumed extensive lake sediments (and hydrologic networks), present in the central Sahara, which had been dated to the late Pleistocene. The talk will examine these lake sediments in southern Libya (the Fazzan), a study which formed part of a long-term program in this part of Libya, prior to the ‘arab spring’ uprising. The talk will focus particularly on the sedimentology and chronology of these sediments, which shows that some of these lake sediments are in fact much older, and indicate the first aridification of the Sahara in the Miocene.

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The End-Triassic mass extinction: what went extinct and why?
Alex Dunhill Ph.D., University of Leeds

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The Rock Route - a geological tour of the NW Highlands Geopark
Lesley Collins

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Cancelled

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John Milne Documentary
Will Twycross & Paul Kabrna

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